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Don Michael Hudson
Chair, Bible and Religion

423.652.4154
Biography

Don Michael Hudson is a faculty member in the King College of Arts and Sciences where he is also the Chair of the Philosophy and Religion department. He specializes in the historical section (Former Prophets) of the Old Testament, and in particular, he is dedicated to understanding and reading the book of Judges in light of new Syro-Palestinian archaeological evidence in tandem with modern theory and methods (Academia.edu). Over the last ten years he has studied Iron Age 1 and 2 in Israel, Jordan, and Turkey. In Israel, he has directed King’s participation in the Lautenschlager Tel Azekah excavation led by Manfred Oeming of Heidelberg University. Each summer he leads a team of undergraduate students to Palestine in pursuit of epistemological humility, excellence in scholarship, and nuanced thinking in regards to religion and geo-politics.

As a biblical scholar and a student of the New Hermeneutic, Don’s insistent goal has been to understand the development and function of the religious impulse in general, but more specifically, the religion of ancient “Israel.” In this vein he is currently completing a book entitled When Time Stumbled: Identity and Disintegration in Judges which profiles the most recent findings and artifacts from Syro-Palestinian archaeology in the Southern Levant and how these findings illuminate the book of Judges.  Though Judges is most definitely a post-exilic, Judahite work we can view some of the earliest religious impulses of the historic Israel community, and we can trace the evolution and development of this particular religion through Iron 1 and 2 and into the Persian period.

For three decades now Don has studied and emphasized the need for a fresh approach to reading and understanding the Christian Scriptures especially as we move into the 21st century. Global, modern Christianity suffers the stigma of anti-science and anti-reason (rightly deserved), but more importantly, it also faces the stark reality of irrelevance in an increasingly complex world. Can we read the Christian Scriptures in a way that addresses the human condition in a relevant, helpful manner? Can we answer the question, “So What?” in meaningful, intelligent ways? What do these texts and narratives have to say to people in the modern age?

With these issues and questions in mind, he co-founded the Seattle School of Theology and Psychology in 1996. He crafted the original vision of the school, hired faculty and staff, recruited students, raised funds, and designed the curriculum for the MA in Theology and the MDiv. He and his team developed all the courses in an attempt to redesign graduate studies for the 21st century. The Seattle School continues to thrive with over 200 graduate students annually. After joining the Philosophy and Religion department at Appalachian State, Dr. Hudson developed innovative pedagogies to engage college students with the pressing issues related to religion in the modern age. At King he has developed an innovative class titled Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice. As a central component to a liberal arts education it is important for students to understand and articulate the Judeo-Christian religion in the modern age. This class has been popular with students and has garnered national attention. This course is not only core to King University but also central to his teaching philosophy in regards to the relevance and limitations of religion. Each student must reflect critically upon his or her worldview, understand what an academic study of religion entails with a particular emphasis on determining the difference between moderate and militant religious expressions. As a final project, each student must produce an articulate, objective, informed presentation on the Judeo-Christian worldview as a foundation for global civilization.

He has also served as visiting professor at universities in Perth; Australia (1999), Vienna, Austria (1997); Kiev, Ukraine (1998, 1999); Monterrey, Mexico (2002); St. Petersburg, Russia (1998); Manila, Philippines (1994); London; England (1991); and Beijing, China (1999, 2000). Dr. Hudson has advised approximately 30 undergraduate and graduate students who have presented research at regional, national, and international conferences.

As chair of the Philosophy and Religion, Dr. Hudson has been actively promoting undergraduate research and scholarly activities in the College of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Hudson also promotes education in his community by speaking regularly at churches, local high schools, community colleges, student organizations, and with local news media about religious violence and extremism and Iron Age archaeology in Israel. Dr. Hudson also serves on the governing board of the King Institute of Faith and Culture. The King Institute is dedicated to conversation on the issues of faith and culture. In this capacity he guides the internationally known lecture series in major decisions and serves as speaker and essayist.

Don has authored, co-authored, or edited five books and written over 50 essays and articles in journals such as Imagiato et Ratio, Dictionary of Biblical Imagery, Mars Hill Review, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Inklings, The Everyday Study Bible, Sojourners, and Zeitschrift fur die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft. He also founded and co-directed the Mars Hill Review where he served as concept editor for nine years.  He has given more than 300 research and public scholarship presentations in 47 states and 11 countries. He has also been a consultant with international organizations managing refugee populations in Germany, Austria, and Turkey.

For more information:

donmichaelhudson.com

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU-lY1qS1R1bdGXQmnGSR6g

Education
  • Postdoctoral Studies in Syro-Palestinian Archaeology: 2012-2015. Syro-Palestinian Archaeology in the Southern Levant with Oded Lipschits, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Yuval Gadot, Tel Aviv University; and Manfred Oeming, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany; Al Quds University, Institute of Archaeology, excavator in Samaria and Matt Adams, Albright Institute of Archaeological Research.
  • Ph.D. Ancient Near Eastern Languages and Literature: 1999. Dissertation: “When Time Stumbled: Judges as Postmodern.” Westminster, Philadelphia, PA. Advisors: Peter Miscall, Tremper Longman, Allen Groves, and Carl Raschke. Scored highest score in the history of Westminster on PhD comprehensive exams.
  • Tutoring with Carl Raschke, University of Denver, Denver, CO: 1992-1999. Concentrated in the study of semiotics and postmodern philosophy with a focus on Heidegger, Levinas, Derrida, Deleuze, Kristeva, and Cixous.
  • Tutoring with Tamara Eskenazi, Hebrew Union, Los Angeles, CA:  1991, 1998. Concentrated in French feminist literature, Hebrew Literature, Rabbinic Literature, and Midrashic Studies.
  • Tutoring with Peter Miscall, St. Thomas, Denver, CO: 1991-1994. Concentrated study in literary criticism of the Hebrew Bible, postmodern thought, feminist criticism, and new directions in philosophy.  Peter and I focused on the hermeneutics of Heidegger, Gadamer, Kristeva, Derrida, Foucault, and Lyotard.
  • Iliff School of Theology, Denver, CO: 1992. “Feminist Approaches to the Hebrew Bible” Tamara Eskenazi. Emphasis on feminist literary theory as applied to Hebrew narrative including methodologies for reading, plot analysis, characterization, Jewish and Christian reception history, and Rabbinic and Midrashic interpretations.
  • University of Denver, Denver, CO: 1991. “Religion, Sex, and Violence” Carl Raschke. Studied theory and method of the study of religion emerging from Continental thought, in particular, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Deleuze, Girard, and Kristeva.
  • St. Thomas Theological Seminary, Denver, CO: 1991. “Literary Approaches to the Hebrew Bible” Peter Miscall. Introduction to various methods of modernist, postmodernist, and post-colonial reading methods with a particular emphasis on the “new” literary criticism from the 1960’s on. Peter highlighted various theories of reading and applied them to Hebrew Bible texts. We analyzed the narratives of Samuel and Kings in depth.
  • Th.M.  Ancient Near Eastern Semitics: 1991. Thesis: “The Contribution of Characterization to Judges 19-21.” Grace Theological Seminary, Winona Lake, IN. My time here focused on study of Hebrew Bible with a particular focus on languages (Greek, Hebrew, Aramaic), hermeneutics, and Ancient Near Eastern history. Scored highest in the history of the school on Greek entrance exam.
  • Postgraduate Work in Marriage and Family Therapy: 1991. Colorado Christian University, Denver, CO. I continued this course of study by taking 44 hours of postgraduate study in advanced therapy. I did this primarily to acquire the LPC in the state of Colorado and national board certification status. I achieved both of these in 1992. Also functioned as an intern working with 8 graduate students weekly under the supervision of psychologists/professors.
  • M.A.C. Therapy: 1990. Colorado Christian University, Denver, CO. Studied under Dr. Larry Crabb. Focused on existential psychodynamic therapy and adult victims of sexual abuse. I pursued this degree to study psychological methods of interpreting biblical texts. My study focused on psychological theory and method and its impact on hermeneutics. Awarded one-year internship with the Institute.
  • M.Div.     Biblical and Religious Studies, Christian Ministry: 1986. Bob Jones University, Greenville, SC. Traditional master of divinity study but began to focus earnestly on Hebrew Literature and New Testament Studies. During my studies I also functioned as a lecturer in Beginning biblical Greek and then Intermediate Greek teaching advanced grammar and translation. During this time, I also became proficient in Hebrew, Greek, and Latin. By the time I finished I have translated approximately 20% of the Hebrew Bible and 75% of the Greek New Testament.
  • M.A.R. Classics and Religion: 1983. Bob Jones University, Greenville, SC. New Testament Studies and Greek Language.    55% of the Greek New Testament translated. Awarded Most Outstanding Master’s Student.
  • B.A. Biblical Studies and Ancient Languages: 1981. Bob Jones University, Greenville, SC. Majored in biblical studies and minored in Koine Greek. 45% of the Greek New Testament translated by graduation. Invited to lecture in Beginning Greek in exchange for room, board, and graduate tuition.
Recent Publications and Presentations

Books

Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice. 2nd Ed. (Bristol, TN: Pulp Press, July 2014).

Men of Courage: God’s Call to Move Beyond the Silence of Adam. (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, May 2013).

Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice. (Seattle: CAST Press, July 2011).

El Silencio de Adan. Spanish trans. The Silence of Adam. (Mexico City: Christian Literature Press, May 2003).

Adamovo mlceni. Hungarian trans. The Silence of Adam (Praha: Navrat domu, 1998).

Das Schweigen der Manner: Und was wirklich dahintersteckt. German trans. The Silence of Adam (Munich: Brunnen-Verlag, January, 1997).

Het Sterke geslacht?: Zin en Onzin over de Flinkheid van de Man. Dutch trans. The Silence of Adam (Driebergen, Netherlands: Navigator Boeken, Summer, 1996).

Be Strong, Be Courageous. (Hammersmith, London: Harper Collins, Summer, 1996).

The Silence of Adam. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Press, March, 1995). The paperback is in its 9th printing. Over 120,000 copies sold.

Articles

• Formal Invitation: Phyllis Trible and Rachel Magdalene, Eds. Chapter 12 in Feminist Influence on Biblical Methodology, article due Dec. 30, 2017. Proposed title: “Julia Kristeva and the Psychology of Religion.”

• Formal Invitation: Rachel Magdalene, Ed. Feminist Hermeneutics, Gender, and Biblical Law, article due Dec. 30, 2017. Proposed title: “Bad Boys Breaking the Law: Crossing the Moral Code.”

• “There, In the Shadows: The Grace of Art in a River Runs Through It,” in Imaginatio et Ratio. (September 2013)

• “Jennifer Phar Davis: Becoming Odyssa: An Analysis,” in Arts Array (February 2013). Invitation to join a consortium of scholars to reflect on this work previous to public lectures held for the Buechner Institute at King University in Bristol, TN (April 2013).

• “Eastertide: A Review of Lauren Winner’s Girl Finds God,” in Arts Array (December 2012). Invitation to join a consortium of scholars to reflect on this work previous to public lectures held for the Buechner Institute at King University in Bristol, TN (March 2013).

• “Dakota and Sacred Place,” in Arts Array (February 2012). Invitation to join a consortium of scholars to reflect on Norris’ work previous to public lectures held for the Buechner Institute at King University in Bristol, TN (April 2012).

• “And What of Beauty?” Compassionate Lifestyle, Vol. 3, Issue 8 (September 2003), pp. 18-22. Reprint from March 2003 “Reading the Wor(l)d: Art, Beauty and the Voice of God,” Sojourners Magazine, Vol. 32, No. 2 (March-April), pp. 42-46.

• “Reading the Wor(l)d: Art, Beauty and the Voice of God,” in Spirit of Fire: Faith, Art, and Action, (Washington, DC: Sojourners Press, 2003), pp. 32-36. March 2003 “Reading the Wor(l)d: Art, Beauty and the Voice of God,” Sojourners Magazine, Vol. 32, No. 2 (March-April), pp. 42-46.

• “Reading the Wor(l)d: Art, Beauty and the Voice of God,” Sojourners Magazine, Vol. 32, No. 2 (March-April), pp. 42-46.

• “Michelangelo’s Pieta,” Christianity and the Arts, Vol. 8, No. 4 (Fall 2001), p. 24. Formal invitation by the publisher of Christianity and the Arts to publish an article in a special edition of the adoration of Mary, mother of Jesus.

•  “The Glory of His Discontent: The Inconsolable Suffering Of God,” Leadership University/ www.leaderu.com/marshill/mhr06/glory1. (Summer 2000). Reprint “The Glory of His Discontent: The Inconsolable Suffering of God,” Mars Hill Review, Vol. 6 (Fall 1996), pp. 21-34.

•  “Love Language Lost: Martin Heidegger and the Fall of Language,” Mars Hill Review, vol. 15 (Fall 1999), pp. 47-55.

• General Editor, “The Dance of Truth,” Mars Hill Review, Vol. 12 (Winter/Spring 1999). Implemented and organized a special issue of the Mars Hill Review on Postmodernism and the American Evangelical. This included choosing and hiring authors and artists, conceptual design, editing, and final publication.

• “The Dance of Truth,” Mars Hill Review, Vol. 12 (Fall 1998), pp. 13-22.

• “Judges,” in The Dictionary of Biblical Imagery, Ed. Leland Ryken (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1998), pp. 467-69.

• “Searching for Our Fathers,” Mars Hill Review, Vol. 10 (Winter/Spring 1998), pp. 37-37.

• “Forgetting to Remember: Running From our Stories,” Mars Hill Review, Vol. 8 (Summer 1997), pp. 40-65.

• “To Find a Place: Sacred Living in a Secular World,” Mars Hill Review, Vol. 7 (Winter/Spring 1997), pp. 38-52.

• “Living by Story—A Counselor’s Creed,” Career and Counselor, Vol. 7 No.1 (Winter 1997), pp. 37- 38. Reprint in Britain, “Come, Bring Your Story,” Mars Hill Review: Premier Issue, pp. 73-86.

• “The Glory of His Discontent: The Inconsolable Suffering of God,” Mars Hill Review, Vol. 6 (Fall 1996), pp. 21-34.

• “The Three Languages of Mentoring: Saul, Jonathan, and David,” Mars Hill Review, Vol. 5 (Summer 1996), pp. 23-31.

• Contributor to the Everyday Study Bible. Eds. Joel B Green, Tremper Longman, and Carl F.H. Henry (Nashville, TN: Nelson Bibles, 1996/2003).

• “Garden of Eden,” in Everyday Study Bible. Eds. Joel B Green, Tremper Longman, and Carl F.H. Henry (Nashville, TN: Nelson Bibles, 1996/2003), p. 29.

• “Adam,” in Everyday Study Bible. Eds. Joel B Green, Tremper Longman, and Carl F.H. Henry (Nashville, TN: Nelson Bibles, 1996/2003), p. 39.

• “Flood,” in Everyday Study Bible. Eds. Joel B Green, Tremper Longman, and Carl F.H. Henry (Nashville, TN: Nelson Bibles, 1996/2003), p. 90.

• “Deborah,” in Everyday Study Bible. Eds. Joel B Green, Tremper Longman, and Carl F.H. Henry (Nashville, TN: Nelson Bibles, 1996/2003), p. 179.

• “Vision,” in Everyday Study Bible. Eds. Joel B Green, Tremper Longman, and Carl F.H. Henry (Nashville, TN: Nelson Bibles, 1996/2003), pp. 309-10.

• March 1996 “From Chaos to Cosmos: Sacred Space in the Ancient Near East,” Zietschrift für die Alttestamentliche Wissenschaft, 108 Bd. (March 1996), pp. 87-97.

•  “Is Art Necessary for the Christian?” Mars Hill Review, Vol. 2 (May 1995), pp. 31-40.

•  “Living by Story,” Inklings Magazine. Vol. 1, Issue 4 (Winter 1995), pp. 6-7. Reprint “Come, Bring Your Story,” Mars Hill Review: Premier Issue (1994), pp. 73-86.

•  “Afterword,” to Royer’s Round Top Café: A Relational Odyssey. (Nashville, TN: Favorite Recipes Press, 1995), p. 171.

•  “Come, Bring Your Story,” Mars Hill Review: Premier Issue (1994), pp. 73-86.

• “Living in a Land of Epithets: Anonymity in Judges 19-21,” Journal for the Study of the Old Testament. 62: 1994, pp. 49-66.

• “The Unbridled Imagination of Gabriel García Márquez,” Inklings Magazine. Vol. 1, Issue 2 (Fall 1994), pp. 5-6.

Currently working on: Dance of the White Crane: A Memoir;  “Morality and Holiness: Nietzsche at Daybreak,” to be presented to Zietschrift für die Alttestamentliche Wissenschaft;  “Requiem for Blue,” to be presented to Image; multiple articles on Judges; analysis of Cain and the use of violence in the monotheistic tradition; a critique of Avraham Faust’s Ethnogenesis of Israel; and an article on Samaria.

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